On Every Street (The Artists Trilogy #0.5) by Karina HalleOn Every Street by Karina Halle
Published March 2013
Series: The Artists Trilogy #0.5
Genres: Contemporary Romance, Romantic Suspense
four-stars
Format: eBook
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When young con artist Ellie Watt decides to call herself Eden White and go after the drug lord who ruined her as a child, she never expects to fall for one of his henchmen. But Javier Bernal is no ordinary man. Subtly dangerous and overwhelmingly seductive, Eden finds herself passionately in love with Javier, the very person she's set-up to betray. With her body and heart in a heated battle against her deep need for revenge, no one will walk away from this con a winner.

Ellie Watt is out for one thing: revenge. She wants to go after the person who made her life a living hell, and knows how to beat this person at her own game: by getting close to his right hand and striking when he least expects it.

Yet, Ellie is still young and innocent, and little does she expect to fall completely for the one person she is supposed to fake it with: Javier Bernal, who doesn’t treat her at all like the coldhearted killer he is. Will she forget her rage and her desire for revenge for the one she loves, or will she not be able to forget what his boss did to her when she was only a child?

On Every Street is a short story that can be read either at the very end of the “Artists Trilogy”, or after part 1, Sins and Needles – which I did. It is not just another short story, not just another supplement with sparse little tidbits here and there, which do not add up to anything consistent. On Every Street is a story on its own, and will give you a very detailed insight into what actually happened to Ellie before she re-unites with Camden in Sins and Needles. It explains her rather disturbing relationship with Javier Bernal, and does it very well.

As expected, Karina Halle’s stories are totally unexpected, so very different, and so very captivating. Karina has a great way with words, and is somewhat of a con-artist herself. She can make a reader feel sorry for (or even appreciate) even the most ruthless character.

I absolutely recommend you read this as the very valuable addition to the Artists Trilogy it is.